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dc.creatorSimeunović, Dragan M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-02T11:57:22Z
dc.date.available2021-04-02T11:57:22Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn0486-6096
dc.identifier.urihttp://rfpn.fpn.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/290
dc.description.abstractIn books and articles focused on the problem of homegrown terrorism authors from different countries mostly describe this kind of terrorism in very different ways. Usually, homegrown terrorism is connected with the promotion of violent radicalization and different forms of ideologically based violence. The Internet especially has aided in facilitating violent radicalization and the process of homegrown terrorism in the United States and in the EU. Understanding the motivational factors that lead to violent radicalization and homegrown terrorism or other forms of ideologically based violence is a vital step toward eradicating these threats. The USA and Europe devote a lot of attention to Islamic terrorism because of the post 9/11 legacy both in terms of the threats and in terms of the anti-terrorist policy.en
dc.publisherInstitut za međunarodnu politiku i privredu, Beograd
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.sourceReview of International Affairs
dc.subjecthomegrown terrorismen
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjectEUen
dc.subjectviolent radicalizationen
dc.subjectIslamist terrorismen
dc.subjectBalkan connectionen
dc.subjectcountermeasuresen
dc.titleHomegrown terrorism in the United States and in the EUen
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.epage18
dc.citation.issue1141
dc.citation.other62(1141): 5-18
dc.citation.spage5
dc.citation.volume62
dc.identifier.rcubconv_669
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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