Show simple item record

dc.creatorVladisavljević, Nebojša
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-02T12:07:51Z
dc.date.available2021-04-02T12:07:51Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1468-3857
dc.identifier.urihttp://rfpn.fpn.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/452
dc.description.abstractThe paper shows that sustained popular protest is a recurrent feature in many authoritarian regimes and that a regime type strongly shapes its characteristics. Popular protest often leads to important changes in the personal composition and policies of elites, which considerably affect the structure and operation of authoritarian regimes, and at times produce regime change. Evidence is provided from authoritarianism in Poland and Yugoslavia, in which sustained protests contributed to the fall of communism, and from competitive authoritarian regimes in post-communist Serbia and Ukraine, which were repeatedly undermined by protest waves and brought to an end by pressure from below'.en
dc.publisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Integrated and Interdisciplinary Research (IIR or III)/47026/RS//
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceSoutheast European and Black Sea Studies
dc.subjectpopular protesten
dc.subjectauthoritarianismen
dc.subjectregime changeen
dc.subjectYugoslaviaen
dc.subjectPolanden
dc.subjectSerbiaen
dc.subjectUkraineen
dc.titlePopular protest in authoritarian regimes: evidence from communist and post-communist statesen
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.epage157
dc.citation.issue2
dc.citation.other14(2): 139-157
dc.citation.rankM23
dc.citation.spage139
dc.citation.volume14
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14683857.2014.901725
dc.identifier.rcubconv_1298
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84899748963
dc.identifier.wos000335213300001
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record